Fashions Shoots with Beck and Hanson

This is what the world is for, making electricity

Comments (View)
Mar 9, 2014 10:14pm

requested: johnny depp + tim burton characters

requested: johnny depp + tim burton characters

(Source: colllages, via capriamovies)

Comments (View)
Mar 6, 2014 3:24pm
Comments (View)
Mar 6, 2014 3:22pm
Comments (View)
Mar 6, 2014 3:19pm
ladiesagainsthumanity:

via @betsythemuffin

ladiesagainsthumanity:

via @betsythemuffin

Comments (View)
Feb 19, 2014 3:37pm
oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

Comments (View)
Feb 6, 2014 4:24pm
slaughterhouse90210:

 “She felt a disappointment so familiar it was almost a comfort.” 
― Jennifer Egan, The Invisible Circus

slaughterhouse90210:

“She felt a disappointment so familiar it was almost a comfort.”

― Jennifer Egan, The Invisible Circus

Comments (View)
Feb 6, 2014 4:24pm
slaughterhouse90210:

"For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?”
― Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

slaughterhouse90210:

"For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?”

― Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Comments (View)
Feb 6, 2014 3:59pm
slaughterhouse90210:

“Try to learn to let what is unfair teach you.” ― David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

slaughterhouse90210:

“Try to learn to let what is unfair teach you.”
― David Foster Wallace,
Infinite Jest

Comments (View)
Feb 6, 2014 3:58pm
slaughterhouse90210:

“There are two important days in a woman’s life: the day she is born and the day she finds out why.”― Terry Tempest Williams, When Women Were Birds

slaughterhouse90210:

“There are two important days in a woman’s life: the day she is born and the day she finds out why.”
― Terry Tempest Williams,
When Women Were Birds

Comments (View)
Feb 6, 2014 3:55pm
slaughterhouse90210:

"The real marriage of true minds is for any two people to possess a sense of humor or irony pitched in exactly the same key, so that their joint glances on any subject cross like interarching searchlights." — Edith Wharton, A Backward Glance

slaughterhouse90210:

"The real marriage of true minds is for any two people to possess a sense of humor or irony pitched in exactly the same key, so that their joint glances on any subject cross like interarching searchlights."
— Edith Wharton, A Backward Glance

Page 1 of 322